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THERE IS ALWAYS MORE TO EXPLORE IN A GROWING FIELD OF KNOWLEDGE & EXPERIENCE


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THERE IS ALWAYS MORE TO EXPLORE IN A GROWING FIELD OF KNOWLEDGE & EXPERIENCE


 

PUBLICATIONS 2017

-        'Wicked city problems; Creative cavalry to the rescue!', Peter Everts, TSIF.eu, March 2017 (Paper for Barcelona Smart City Expo 2017);

-        Article in Impact Boom, 'Participatory City Making & Empowering People To Create Social Change', Ingrid Mulder, March 2017;

PUBLICATIONS 2016

-        'Het spel van organisatievernieuwing', Peter Everts, Januari 2016

-        'Design for Liveability: Connecting Local Stakeholders as Co-creative Partnerships', Jorik Hepworth, Ingrid Mulder and Maaike Klinsmann, ServDes. 2016 Fifth Service Design and Innovation conference;

PUBLICATIONS 2014

-        Article in SIGMA, 'Sociale innovatie: meerwaarde in krachtig samenspel', Peter Everts, Tony van Acquoy and Mariëlle Gebben, TSIF.eu, July 2014;

-        AWT report ‘De kracht van sociale innovatie’, cooperating with the AWT, The Hague (The AWT is a Dutch strategic advisory council which advises Government and Parliament) – met bijdrage van Tony van Acquoy, TSIF.eu, February 2014;

PUBLICATIONS 2013

-        Article in the EurObserver, ‘Youth Unemployment: a lost generation?, AEGEE Groningen – Tony van Acquoy, TSIF.eu, July 2013;

-        Article in the EurObserver, Social inclusion in perspective’, AEGEEGroningen – Tony van Acquoy, TSIF.eu, June 2013;

-        Article in JPEOPLE, Embracing change through Art, Design & New leadership’, Peter Everts (TSIF.eu) and Ilaria Forte (Radicalfuture), September 2013;

     ‘Manifest Werkkamer van de Stad‘, Peter Everts, TSIF.eu, 2013;

PUBLICATIONS 2012

-        Artikel in de Actuaris, themanummer innovatie ‘Creativiteitcreatie en innovatie’Actuaris is het magazine van het Actuarieel Genootschap – Peter Everts, TSIF.eu, april 2012;

-        'How competences capabilities and market dynamics explain SME performance', the Strategic Management Society (Journal of Management) – Jack Crielaard, TSIF.eu, April 2012;

-        'De waarde van zuiveringsslib'het project ‘Duurzame slibverwerking Mierlo’ heeft Waterschap De Dommel nieuwe inzichten en instrumenten opgeleverd in de waarde en mogelijkheden van zuiveringsslib – Toine van Dartel (De Dommel) en Jack Crielaard (TSIF.eu), H2O tijdschrift voor watervoorziening en waterbeheer, mei 2012;

-        'Fit Or Failure: Strategic Fit By Employee-Market-Connection'Authors Jack Crielaard (TSIF.eu), Ron Kemp Onno (S.W.F.) Omta and Emiel (E.F.M.) Wubben (Wageningen University and Research Center), EURAM 2012, June 2012

This study investigates the fit between people, working in an organisation, and the markets of the organisation. Based on an ecological system model the term ‘strategic fit’ is applied to the direct relationship between the organisation’s human resources and the characteristics of the relevant market. This study provides new insights in the debate between the positioning school and the resource based view (RBV) of the firm to enhance high performing organisations, open innovation and self-direction of employees. According to our results from small and medium enterprises (SME’s) the RBV needs enrichment with a connection between employee and market. A good fit between these two indicators enhance results in the field of people and profit, and, still lagging, planet. This might contribute to a business practice where people and their relations are the starting point for corporate social responsibility.

PUBLICATIONS 2011

- 'Creativiteitscreatie: Het spel, de passie en de verbeelding', Peter Everts, oktober 2011; 'Creativity creation': The summery is in English: 'Creation of creativity: play, passion and the imagination', PhD Thesis Peter Everts, October 2011;

- 'Naar de kapper; over creativiteit en organisatieontwikkeling', Merk & Reputatie, nr. 4, november 2011

 

FROM and WITH PARTNERS | ALLIANCES

- 'The EUWIN’s First Year Report', February 2014;

- 'The Dortmund/Brussels Position Paper on Workplace Innovation', July 2012;

- 'Qua Beratung – Qualität im Beratungsprozess. Zur Förderung der Beschäftigungsfähigkeit von KMU und ihren Beschäftigten – Europäischer Austausch und Vergleich', BBB Dortmund, July 2012;

-' Innovation that sticks', Stenden Hogeschool, oktober 2012

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VIDEOS ON SOCIAL INNOVATION


VIDEOS ON SOCIAL INNOVATION


IMAGINE ALL THE PEOPLE LIVING FOR TODAY …. (THE BEATLES). AND LET'S CREATE OUR TOMORROW. HERE YOU CAN FIND SOME INSPIRING VIDEOS TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SOCIAL INNOVATION:

1. The Wilco Project: Understanding innovations in local welfare to strenghten social cohesion and lower social inequalities, 2010-2014. One of the videos of The Wilco Project is 'Social innovation across Europe':

 

2. SiG Knowledge Hub has been exploring the various qualities and elements that support successful social innovation: an overview.

3. The Good Life Project®: What is the meaning of life? Brené Brown, Seth Godin and 27 other successful entrepreneurs, artists and world-changers wee asked to define "good life". In the quest for the meaning of life and how to live your life to the fullest, Good Life Project® founder, Jonathan Fields asked these successful people from many different walks of life, and their answers may change your life:

4.  URBES Barcelona: Embracing the vision of a greener future. This short film introduces Barcelona as one of the European cities aligned with the URBES - Urban Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services project. The URBES project is funded as part of the EU's 7th Framework Programme for Research by BiodivERsA, which is a network of 21 research-funding agencies across 15 European countries promoting pan-European research that generates new knowledge for the conservation and sustainable management of biodiversity.

 

5.  TRANSIT (TRANsformative Social Innovation Theory) is an ambitious 4 year long research project that aims to develop a theory of transformative social innovation useful for academics, policy makers as well as practitioners.

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VIEWS ON SOCIAL INNOVATION


VIEWS ON SOCIAL INNOVATION


It is often said that the INUIT have dozens of words to refer to snow and ice. From this perspective it's not surprising that the colourful and human concept of social innovation knows many definitions too.

 

1. Social innovation is about new ideas that work to address pressing unmet needs. We simply describe it as innovations that are both social in their ends and in their means. Social innovations are new ideas (products, services and models) that simultaneously meet social needs (more effectively that alternatives) and create new social relationships or collaborations. (Open Book of Social Innovation, Murray, Calulier-Grice and Mulgan, March 2010)

 

2. ‘We’ve reached a new stage of social innovation in which bold ideas are now being turned into real-world projects.’ Neil Kleinman of New York University’s graduate school of public service says social innovation has evolved twice since its creation and right now we’re in a period that he calls social innovation 3.0. The original iteration was the realization that new ideas and tactics were necessary to solve the world’s problems. That was followed by a stage of developing and testing those ideas. Our current stage, perhaps the most important, is about institutionalizing those ideas so that they can take hold in businesses, governments, and organizations around the world. How to?

  • Instead of trying to come up with a brand new idea on your own, work with the people whom you’re actually trying to serve.
  • Punch above your weight. Try to connect with organizations and companies, even if they seem larger scale than your innovation.
  • Make use of technology. This is obvious, but in doing so, also make sure that what you’re designing keeps the end user and the problem you want to solve in focus. (Morgan Clendanieleditor of Co.Exist, 2012)

 

3. SOCIAL INNOVATIONS, Rediscovering Social Innovation (SSIReview)

Social entrepreneurship and social enterprise have become popular rallying points for those trying to improve the world. These two notions are positive ones, but neither is adequate when it comes to understanding and creating social change in all of its manifestations. The authors make the case that social innovation is a better vehicle for doing this. They also explain why most of today’s innovative social solutions cut across the traditional boundaries separating nonprofits, government, and for-profit businesses. More to read ….

 

4. Social innovations are innovations that are social in both their ends and their means – new ideas (products, services and models) that simultaneously meet social needs (more effectively than alternatives) and create new social relationships or collaborations. They are innovations that are not only good for society but also enhance society’s capacity to act. Social innovations take place across boundaries between the public sector, the private sector, the third sector and the household. (The European Commission)

The European Union has a rich history of social innovation. These solutions find new ways of meeting social needs and create tools for social policy and investment. Social innovation is growing into a vibrant and creative field.

 

5. SIRE blog ‘defining social innovation’, submitted by Anna Davies

Despite the growing interest in social innovation among policymakers, foundations, researchers and academic institutions around the world, there is currently no common definition of social innovation, but rather a large number of different definitions in circulation.  Some of these are very specific and exclude many examples of social innovation, while others are so broad that they describe projects and organisations that are not particularly innovative, even if they are in some way social.

This is partly because social innovation is a practice-led field – understandings, definitions and meanings have emerged through people doing things in new ways rather than thinking about them in an academic way. And since the practice of social innovation looks and feels different in different fields, sectors and continents, it is not surprising that meanings and definitions vary. More to read …..

 

6. Social innovation refers to the application of innovative, practical, sustainable, market-based approaches that achieve transformative social and/or environmental change, with an emphasis on under-served populations. Social innovation is becoming a priority for decision-makers at the most senior levels. In this new age of austerity, as governments search for guidance and inspiration on scaling cost-effective solutions to social problems, social entrepreneurship has taken centre stage. Social enterprises balance a social mission with financial viability and sustainability, existing between the public sector and private markets in both the developed and developing world. 

 

7. ‘Mapping the various meanings of social innovation: Towards a differentiated understanding of an emerging concept’ by Dominik Rüede and Kathrin Lurtz (EBS Business School)

They address the ambiguities on social innovation by giving a detailed overview of the different understandings of social innovation used in current literature. Hence, the research question is “Which social innovation conceptualizations exist and what do they mean?”. Subsequently, we examine the most prominently used social innovation conceptualizations and evaluate how well they meet the criteria of concept clarity (Suddaby, 2010). More to read ….

 

8.  “.. a novel solution to a problem that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or just… [where] the value created accrues primarily to society as a whole rather than private individuals. Social Innovation focuses attention on the ideas and solutions that create social value—as well as the processes through which they are generated” (Stanford Centre for social innovation).